Charred Cauliflower Romesco

Charred Cauliflower Romesco

If you thought cauliflower was boring, this is the recipe for you. This is the most delicious cauliflower dish, bar none, that I have ever eaten. Truly, it is a masterpiece.

It is a simple dish to make, and is incredibly flavorful. The bright, tangy Romesco sauce pairs just beautifully with the charred smoky cauliflower. Then, to finish this masterpiece, some micro greens (I used micro kale) tossed in a little vinaigrette. SO, so delicious.

The cooking technique here is what makes the cauliflower a masterpiece. You take a heavy-bottomed skillet such as a cast iron skillet and lightly sprinkle it with oil. Then, you cut the cauliflower florets in half, making one flat side. You place the florets cut side down in the pan and turn the heat on to medium. Next, cover the pan so that the cauliflower steams and cooks through and is velvety and soft. You just check it every few minutes to make sure it is not completely black – you just want a deep dark brown char. It takes 5 to 8 minutes to cook your cauliflower.

While the cauliflower is cooking, you just whirl up the Romesco sauce in a blender and toss the greens in a little vinaigrette. Then – assemble when the cauliflower is done.

The surprise of this dish is not that it is very tasty – but that it is also so good for you. It will fit most any healthy way of eating – it is Whole30, vegan, low carb and fairly low in healthy fat.

This dish is proof that side dishes don’t have to be boring!

Put this on your Thanksgiving table for rave reviews!

CHARRED CAULIFLOWER WITH ROMESCO SAUCE

1/2 head of cauliflower
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
16 ounce jar of roasted red peppers, drained
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1/4 cup roasted almonds
1 tablespoon sherry vinegar
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper sauce
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
Garnish with micro greens, if desired

Sprinkle a heavy-bottomed skillet such as a cast iron skillet with vegetable oil. Cut the cauliflower florets in half, making one flat side. Place the florets cut side down in the pan and turn the heat on to medium. Next, cover the pan so that the cauliflower steams and cooks through and is velvety and soft. Check it every few minutes to make sure it is not completely black – you just want a deep dark brown char. It takes 5 to 8 minutes to cook your cauliflower.

While cauliflower is cooking, place remaining ingredients in a food processor and process until very smooth. Taste and add additional salt and pepper if desired.

Spread sauce on a servings place. Place charred cauliflower on top and then garnish with micro greens, if desired.

Charred Cauliflower Platter

Charred Cauliflower Romesco
 
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Author:
Recipe type: Side Dish
Serves: 4 to 6 servings
Ingredients
  • ½ head of cauliflower
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 16 ounce jar of roasted red peppers, drained
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • ¼ cup roasted almonds
  • 1 tablespoon sherry vinegar
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper sauce
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon pepper
Instructions
  1. Sprinkle a heavy-bottomed skillet such as a cast iron skillet with vegetable oil. Cut the cauliflower florets in half, making one flat side. Place the florets cut side down in the pan and turn the heat on to medium. Next, cover the pan so that the cauliflower steams and cooks through and is velvety and soft. Check it every few minutes to make sure it is not completely black - you just want a deep dark brown char. It takes 5 to 8 minutes to cook your cauliflower.
  2. While cauliflower is cooking, place remaining ingredients in a food processor and process until very smooth. Taste and add additional salt and pepper if desired.
  3. Spread sauce on a servings place. Place charred cauliflower on top and then garnish with micrograms, if desired.

 

Cauliflower Salad Recipe

A healthy cauliflower side salad, perfect for any Easter brunch. 

Colorful Cauliflower Salad #paleo #whole30 #lowcarb

Colorful Cauliflower Salad

I haven’t talked much here about my mother who raised me, my adoptive mom Fay, other than to mention that I love her very, very much, and that she is also very, very much not a foodie. Both remain true, but on the latter point, I may sometimes give the impression that she never cooked anything good or even decent. Not true! While our staples leaned toward frozen mixed vegetables microwaved with margarine and the like, she sometimes pulled a randomly excellent homemade dish. Such as this one!

When I saw the beauties below on display in our local grocery, my mind immediately wandered back to the cauliflower dish my mom called “Cauliflower a la Greque”; I believe she got the recipe from her McCall’s cookbook, the source of most of her recipes and thus the source of most of my early attempts. (I cannot vouch for its Grecian authenticity.)

Instant inspiration from the produce section at Zupan’s

I knew I had to try and recreate it – and with those pastels, how perfect for Easter, eh? Mom served the dish warm, but I like it chilled – try it both ways and see how you like it best. All the better if you have colored cauliflower to work with, but of course it will work fine with plain ol’ white.

And a happy, healthy Passover and Easter week to you if you celebrate. This is a lovely spring side dish (vegan, low carb, and even paleo if you’re okay with using a little wine to cook with) either way.

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Cauliflower Colcannon for St. Patrick’s Day (Whole30) (Paleo) (Low Carb)

A Whole 30, low-carb, nutrient-packed version of the comfort food classic for St. Paddy’s Day.

Cauliflower Colcannon (a.k.a. Caulicannon) for a #paleo #whole30 #lowcarb St. Patrick's Day

Cauliflower Colcannon (a.k.a. Caulicannon) for a #paleo #whole30 #lowcarb St. Patrick’s Day

As one of the unmistakable portents of impending spring, St. Patrick’s Day recipes are starting to pop up all over. I’ve come to love cauliflower rice in so many different forms, so a few years ago, I thought, why not use cauliflower mash as the foundation of a low-carb AND paleo colcannon? Let’s call it Caulicannon.

On top of good flavors, the texture combination works really well here. All on its own, I do generally prefer either ricing cauliflower or roasting it, rather than the pureed version that can be substituted for potatoes, but in this instance, it really hits the spot. My only regret is not doubling the recipe so I’d have more leftovers! Can’t help thinking this would be excellent with some corned beef or bangers, but it would pair well with anything that goes with mashed potatoes.

Slainte to all!…

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Cauliflower Biryani Rice (Whole 30) (Paleo) (Vegan)

A low-carb, paleo side dish to go with any Indian feast!

Cauliflower Biryani Rice #paleo #whole30 #vegan #glutenfree #grainfree

Cauliflower Biryani Rice

This spin on cauliflower rice was originally created to accompany my Tikka Masala Meatballs, but it was so tasty (and is so healthy, by any metric) I thought it deserved its own post. Perfect for Whole 30 – and also happens to be vegan, if you swing that way.

3 cups of riced cauliflower (I pulse it in my food processor) is ABOUT
what I get from one medium head, but if it’s a little more or a little less, don’t sweat it. If you’re using pre-riced cauliflower that’s starting to be sold all over (Trader Joe’s New Seasons, etc.), I just wanted to give you a ballpark amount.

CAULIFLOWER BIRYANI RICE

2 tablespoons coconut oil
1/2 onion, sliced
1 cinnamon stick
4 green cardamom pods
1 teaspoon nigella seeds
1/2 teaspoon  coriander seeds
1/2 teaspoon turmeric
1/4 teaspoon salt (plus more to taste)
3 cups (or thereabouts) cauliflower, riced
1/4 cup sliced almonds
1/4 cup cilantro, chopped

Heat the coconut oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the sliced onion, cinnamon stick, cardamom pods, nigella seeds (you could substitute cumin seeds if you can’t find nigella, a.k.a. charnoushka), coriander seeds, and turmeric. Sauté until onions have started to turn golden brown and the spices are oh-so-fragrant; 4-5 minutes. Add salt and cauliflower and cook for about 7-8 minutes.

Remove cinnamon stick (the other whole spices are fine), take of heat, stir in almonds and cilantro, and serve!

Cauliflower Biryani Rice (Whole 30) (Paleo) (Vegan)
 
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Author:
Recipe type: Side Dish
Cuisine: Indian
Serves: 3-4 servings
Ingredients
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil
  • ½ onion, sliced
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 4 green cardamom pods
  • 1 teaspoon nigella seeds
  • ½ teaspoon coriander seeds
  • ½ teaspoon turmeric
  • ¼ teaspoon salt (plus more to taste)
  • 3 cups (or thereabouts) cauliflower, riced
  • ¼ cup sliced almonds
  • ¼ cup cilantro, chopped
Instructions
  1. Heat the coconut oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the sliced onion, cinnamon stick, cardamom pods, nigella seeds (you could substitute cumin seeds if you can't find nigella, a.k.a. charnoushka), coriander seeds, and turmeric.
  2. Sauté until onions have started to turn golden brown and the spices are oh-so-fragrant; 4-5 minutes.
  3. Add salt and cauliflower and cook for about 7-8 minutes.
  4. Remove cinnamon stick (the other whole spices are fine), take of heat, stir in almonds and cilantro, and serve!

Cauliflower Biryani Rice #paleo #whole30 #vegan #glutenfree #grainfree

Paleo, vegan, Whole 30 Cauliflower Biryani Rice

— posted by Anne

Cocoa Crusted Roasted Cauliflower (Whole30) (Low Carb) (Vegan)

Cocoa Crusted Roasted Cauliflower

Some recipes just make you scratch your head in wonder. Cocoa and Cauliflower are two things I never thought I would see in a recipe together. And yet, here we are.

Foodie Boy Genius Justin Warner coated his cauliflower with cocoa powder and then roasted it. They don’t call him a Boy Wonder for nothing. This is a genius dish, I tell you. The cocoa gives the cauliflower a rich, deep satisfying taste.

I thought it needed a little heat and smokiness, so I decided to add smoked paprika in equal parts with the cocoa powder and then some salt. SO delicious. The one thing I will say is that you should eat this right out of the oven, because if it sits, the moisture form the cauliflower florets will make the cocoa soggy and not crusty.

This dish only takes about 5 minutes of prep time. You just toss the cauliflower florets in some olive oil and then dip the florets in the cocoa powder mixture.

And you’ll never look at cauliflower the same way again.

Cocoa Crusted Roasted Cauliflower

Cocoa Crusted Roasted  Cauliflower

1 small head of cauliflower, hard stem removed and broken into florets
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon cocoa powder
1 tablespoon smoked paprika
1 teaspoon salt

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
Toss the florets in oil . Stir together the cocoa powder, smoked paprika and salt. Hold the florets by the stems and then sprinkle each one generously with the cocoa mixture. Place in a single layer on a baking sheet and bake for 20 to 30 minutes, until cauliflower is fork tender.
Serev warm.

Cocoa Crusted Roasted Cauliflower
 
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Author:
Recipe type: Side Dish
Serves: Serves 4 to 6
Ingredients
  • 1 small head of cauliflower, hard stem removed and broken into florets
  • ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon cocoa powder
  • 1 tablespoon smoked paprika
  • 1 teaspoon salt
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Toss the florets in oil . Stir together the cocoa powder, smoked paprika and salt. Hold the florets by the stems and then sprinkle each one generously with the cocoa mixture. Place in a single layer on a baking sheet and bake for 20 to 30 minutes, until cauliflower is fork tender.
  3. Serev warm.

Other food bloggers do intriguing cauliflower:

Roasted Curried Cauliflower with Lemon and Cumin, Kalyn’s Kitchen
Honey Roasted Cauliflower with Pine Nuts and Crispy Sage, Food for my Family
Buffalo Ranch Cauliflower Nachos, The Wicked Noodle
Roast Cauliflower with Lemon, Almonds and Pomegranate, Healthy Delicious

Roasted Brussels Sprouts Grapes and Shallots

A last-minute Thanksgiving side that takes 10 minutes of your precious holiday cooking time.
Roasted Brussels Sprouts Grapes and Shallots

If you are a Brussels sprouts hater, this dish is for you. The sweetness of the grapes and shallots are a perfect foil for the sprouts – and the nuts add a nice crunch. The medley of the flavors and textures of this dish just sing!

Bonus: this dish takes very little of your time, which is always at a premium on holidays. Just tossing things in oil and spreading them on a baking sheet – so easy, so worth it.

You probably knew this, but Brussels sprouts are some of the world’s healthiest things. They are little powerhouses packed with nutrients, and we should be eating them pretty much every day.

I haven’t always liked Brussels sprouts. In fact, I hated them. This is because most people cooked them incorrectly in the 1970’s. We all just threw them in water and boiled them until they were mushy, sulfury blobs. I still shudder when I think of them this way.

But if you roast them at high heat – now this is a revelation!

My daughter Amy was at my table when I made this recipe – and she posted to all the world: “Only my mom can make Brussels sprouts taste yummy.” This is the child who hated most vegetables!

This is a huge Mom Win!

5.0 from 1 reviews
Roasted Brussels Sprouts Grapes and Shallots
 
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Thro together this amazing side dish in just minutes!
Author:
Recipe type: Side Dish
Cuisine: Holiday
Serves: serves 4 to 6
Ingredients
  • 1 pound Brussels Sprouts
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 2 cups red seedless grapes
  • 2 large shallots, sliced pole to pole in ¼ inch slices
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons Balsamic vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • ¼ cup diced toasted almonds or hazelnuts
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Cut stem end of Brussels sprouts off and cut large sprouts in half. Toss with one tablespoon of olive oil. Spread on a baking sheet in a single layer. Roast for 20 minutes at top of oven.
  3. Toss grapes and shallots with one tablespoon of oil. Add to baking sheet, sprinkle everything with salt and return to oven for another 20 to 30 minutes, until everything is softened and lightly browned.
  4. Remove from oven and place everything on baking sheet in a serving bowl. Pour vinegar and water onto baking sheet and scrape off browned bits with a fork or whisk. Pour over vegetables in serving bowl. Add nuts and toss everything. Serve warm.

Here are some other Brussels dishes with a medley of sweet and crunchy:

Brussels Sprouts, Butternut Squash and Cranberries, Julia’s Album
Brussels Sprouts with Pomegranate, Walnuts and Jalapeño, Alexandra’s Kitchen
Vietnamese Brussels Sprouts with Mint and Cilantro, Jeanette’s Healthy Living

Roasted Acorn Squash with Easy Mole Sauce

The vegans at your table will swoon over this southwest spin on a fall favorite squash!
Roasted Acorn Squash with Mole Sauce and Pepitas

Thanksgiving is really all about the sides. Oh sure, both turkey and tofurky (because: family vegetarians) are on our menu every Thanksgiving. But c’mon – the real fun is the sides. You can be adventurous with the sides. Be creative! Be unique! Be bold! Spike your sides with all the flavors loved by those whose legs are under your table. The Kellys are spice and heat lovers. After all, I come from southern Arizona and grew up on tacos and burros. For our extended family Thanksgiving feasts, my uncles would line up on the porch and have a jalepeno eating contest – we kids squealed with delight when their faces turned bright red and sweat poured off of them in buckets!

I decided a spicy spin on fall acorn squash was in order. This dish has warm fall flavors with a kick of heat: acorn squash, spicy mole with just a pinch of chocolate and crunchy pepitas.

The mole is super easy, and can be made up to a week ahead to help minimize last-minute holiday meal stress. Just soak the dried chiles – they will blend up to be very smooth in your sauce. Just a hint of chocolate goes a long way – you don’t want to be reminded of hot fudge sauce!

Mole sauce is traditionally made with chiles and nuts or seeds as thickeners. Here I have simplified things by using almond butter to make the blending quick and smooth. I love both the flavor and texture of this simple sauce – rich and velvety with a hint of heat and spice.

I like to sprinkle pepitas over the top to add crunch – but you could use sliced almonds as well.

We are firm believers that acorn squash should make it to your table this fall. Check out our oven-free squash rings: Maple Chipotle Waffle Iron Squash, and Moroccan Stuffed Acorn Squash.

Maple Chipotle Waffle Iron Acorn Squash

Moroccan Stuffed Acorn Squash

Roasted Acorn Squash with Simple Mowiele Sauce and Pepitas
 
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Acorn squash with a whole new spicy twist.
Author:
Recipe type: Side Dish
Cuisine: American
Serves: 8 servings
Ingredients
  • 1 large acorn squash
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 4 guajillo or ancho ciles
  • 2 cups vegetable broth
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 cups tomato sauce
  • 1 tablespoon cayenne pepper sauce
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons almond butter
  • 1 tablespoon cocoa powder
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Toasted pepitas (pumpkin seeds) for garnish
Instructions
  1. Cut squash in half and scoop out seeds and strings. Cut each half into 4 wedges. Toss in oil and then spread on a baking sheet. Bake for 50 to 60 minutes, until fork tender and lightly browned.
  2. While squash is roasting, chop the chiles and remove seeds and stem. In a medium saucepan, bring to a boil the chiles, broth, onion. Reduce to a simmer and simmer for 30 minutes, or until chiles are very soft.
  3. Add in all remaining ingredients and let simmer another 10 minutes. Cool to warm.
  4. Blend sauce in a blender and taste and season with salt and pepper.

Other bloggers do fabulous and flavorful roasted squash:

Roasted Acorn Squash with Wild Rice Pistachio Stuffing, A Couple Cooks
Miso Roasted Acorn Squash, Half Baked Harvest
Agave Balsamic Roasted Squash, Kalyn’s KItchen

Three Secrets to Perfect Potato Salad (and Our Potato Salad Moment)

Perfect Potato Salad

Potato salad is one of those iconic dishes with every family having their unique spin. No matter how delicious, how creamy, how flavorful the salad is, you will never enjoy it unless it tastes like the potato salad your mom/grandpa/auntie made for you while you were growing up.

But there are three things – let’s call them three “secrets” – that will take any potato salad any style from good to WOW!

I’ll get to these three things in just a moment. But first, I just have to share with you my greatest potato salad moment ever. And, Yes, I do have a “potato salad moment.”

Here it is.

In the summer of 2000, I had packed my Mom Van to the ceiling with inner tubes, air rafts, towels, picnic baskets and then headed out for the day’s anticipated adventures. Lost Lake, a magazine worthy pristine lake in the foothills of majestic Mount Hood in Oregon was a favorite of the Kelly family. Breathtaking views abound, including the Matterhorn-ish Mount Hood reflecting in the clear blue lake waters. There are huckleberries aplenty for the picking, easy lakeside hikes, people-friendly chipmunks scurrying at your feet begging for crumbs. Usually I happily smiled at the thought of the fun-filled day that stretched out ahead of me.

But today my heart was racing because my newly rediscovered, all-grown-up daughter Anne was among the precious Mom Van cargo.

My birth daughter Anne, born in 1972, and I had been secretly reunited for almost a year. On this Lost Lake day, Anne joined her first Kelly family outing.

Looking back, my anxiety was sort of silly. I fretted over everything. Would she like us? Would the four Kelly kids behave? Would there just be awkward stares across the picnic table? And the food. My biggest worry was the food. Nowhere was that more apparent than in my fretting over that seemingly benign picnic staple: the potato salad.

What if she hated my version of potato salad? What if her mom made it with more mustard? I should have used fresh dill! I should have asked her if she likes boiled eggs! Does she like sweet or dill pickles? If I am her mom, why-oh-why didn’t I know these things about her?

My family had been making our potato salad the same way for years: chunks of potatoes, creamy mayo-based dressing, dill pickles, hard boiled eggs. But what about Anne’s family? Did they like their potato salad sweet or vinegar-y? Celery or no? Flecks of red pepper? Onion tang or without?

Back then, I didn’t know how to approach issues such as the Family Potato Salad. There are no rule books to consult for reuniting with your long-absent biological child. No potato salad etiquette. No Emily Post to consult.

As we unpacked the Mom Van, I resigned myself to making the best of things and apologizing profusely as needed.

It started out to be a lovely day. Anne joined in with the Kelly kids. They all skipped around, arms linked, singing their mountain songs repertoire. Valder-ie! Valder-a! Valdera-ha-ha-ha! They floated and splashed. They chased chipmunks and gathered tadpoles. We all hiked around the whole lake.

When it came time to eat, Anne shared with us her vegan hot dogs, unappealingly named “Tofu Pups.” My sweet son Jake’s words were: “You can hardly tell the difference!” But the choking sound he made spoke volumes. He clearly just wanted to make his newly discovered sister fell loved, accepted, part of us. But then the dreaded moment came: the potato salad tasting.

It turns out I need not have worried. I later would come to know my rediscovered daughter Anne as a gracious and generous soul. But for that moment, I gratefully absorbed her “ooh’s” and “ahh’s” over my potato salad. She even miraculously ate seconds.

And then, of course, I cried. Tears of joy, to be sure, but mostly tears of relief.

She liked my potato salad. She liked us. She liked me. Everything was going to be all right.

So, I will never eat a bite of potato salad in my life without being back in that glorious day in the summer of 2000, when my rediscovered daughter Anne, now my co-blogger, joined our family.

And now back to the three secrets.

SECRET ONE. You must place bite-sized chunks of potato in salted water and boil until fork tender and then you must drain and spread those chunks out on a baking sheet or large cutting board. This will let the steam escape and the chunks will dry out and be perfectly light and dry. They will have a perfect texture and will not be soggy or gummy like they would if you leave them in the cooking pot to cool.

SECRET TWO. You must chill the cooled potato chunks and all ingredients except the dressing in the fridge for at least four hours, up to overnight. This lets the flavors blend and readies the salad for the dressing.

SECRET THREE. You must mix the dressing and chill it SEPARATELY in the fridge. You must then stir it into the salad right before serving. This technique insures that the potatoes will stay light and fluffy and the dressing will stay separate and not get absorbed. This makes for a perfect creamy potato salad.

potato chunks cooling

Chunks of cooked potatoes spread on a baking sheet to cool – allowing steam to escape.

potatoe salad chilling

Chill potato mixture withOUT the dressing to ensure the perfect potato salad texture.

Three Secrets to Perfect Potato Salad
 
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A no fail version of the iconic All American picnic dish.
Author:
Recipe type: Side Dish
Cuisine: American
Serves: 12 servings
Ingredients
  • 5 pounds Russet potatoes
  • 6 large eggs, hard boiled
  • 3 stalks celery, with leaves, diced
  • ½ cup diced dill pickles
  • 3 green onions, thinly sliced
  • ½ cup minced fresh dill
  • 1 cup mayonnaise
  • 1 packet (1 ounce) Hidden Valley Ranch dressing mix
  • ½ cup dill pickle juice (from a jar of dill pickles)
Instructions
  1. Peel potatoes and cut into 2 inch chunks. Place in a pot of well salted water. Bring to a boil and reduce to a simmer. Cook until potato chunks are fork tender, about 10 minutes.
  2. Drain off water and then spread the cooked potato chunks on a baking sheet or large cutting board. Let the steam escape, stirring occasionally, until potatoes are dried.
  3. Place potatoes in a large serving bowl. Peel and dice the eggs. Stir into the potatoes the eggs, celery, diced pickles, green onions and dill. Cover and refrigerate for a minimum of four hours, up to 24 hours.
  4. Mix together the mayonnaise, ranch mix and pickle juice. Toss with the chilled potatoes mixture right before serving. Sprinkle with paprika for a traditional presentation

Other family heirloom potato salads:

Best Potato Salad, Foodie Crush
Potato Salad, Inspired Taste
Best Ever Potato Salad, Brown Eyed Baker

Broccoli Squared: Broccoli Stem Puree with Roasted Broccoli Florets

If you’ve never tried broccoli stems this way – prepare to be amazed.

Broccoli Squared

Broccoli Squared: Roasted Broccoli Florets over Broccoli Stem Puree

I wish I could travel back in time and retrieve all the broccoli stems I’ve so blithely tossed aside over the years. Here I was thinking the florets had all the fun. I had no idea! Why did no one tell me?

Okay, to be fair, I knew of using the stems for slaw, but had never even thought of using them in a puree. Then, a few weeks ago, a recipe from the 21 Day Sugar Detox turned me around. Diane Sanfilippo blew my mind by combining roasted florets with pureed stems. I’ve made it three times since then, adding my own tweaks. Try this and you’ll seriously never throw another stem in the compost again.

(Oh and yes, that is a dish in the shape of the lovely, verdant state of Oregon. I thought this recipe paid perfect tribute to its lush greenness.)…

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Twice Baked Four Leaf Potatoes for St. Paddy’s

Four kinds of greens jazz up these cheesy classics for St. Patrick’s Day. 

twice baked potatoesTwice Baked Potatoes are always crowd pleasers, and adding some emerald greens makes them even more fitting as St. Patrick’s Day fare. Kale, chard, spinach, and parsley add up to four “leaves”.  Get it? I know you do. This recipe was a hit with adults and veggie-reluctant kids alike. I used the twice baked method recommended by the good people at America’s Test Kitchen. They might even be lucky!

Included is a tested and approved dairy-free version in the notes after the main recipe, made using Daiya products, which are soy-free and by far the best non-dairy cheeses I’ve ever tried. …

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