Hot Pink Hummus with Fresh Beets

September 8, 2010 in Gluten Free, Healthy Fare, Side Dishes, Vegan Recipes

Thanks for sharing!

Hummus with fresh beets

As many of you know, if you’re Facebook-friendly with me, I am a bit of a hummus addict. I would eat it every day if I could, I do believe. I love garlicky hummus, lemony hummus, hummus with and without tahini, hummus with avocados and coconut oil,  hummus with roasted red peppers, hummus with pine nuts, hummus with “40 spices”, hummus with sundried tomatoes. I love it in wraps, I love it as a dip for crudite or tortilla chips, I love it spread on toast, I love it just plain eaten by the spoonful. You could say I’m a little obsessed. So when I saw  hot pink hummus in the prepared food section of my local co-op, I knew I had to give it a try.

What was the secret ingredient that made it look suspiciously like the homemade play-doh I made recently? Beets, of course! I do like beets, but don’t eat them on a regular basis, which is a shame since they’re loaded with nutrition, especially folate (so pass this on to any pregnant or nursing mama you know), but also vitamins, antioxidants, fiber and iron.

As with any hummus, it’s as simple to make as can be (the beet is raw; no extra work beside peeling it, though I wonder about leaving it unpeeled and just scrubbed thoroughly – I’ll give this a try sometime!), and any of the amounts are endlessly adjustable – you should absolutely taste as you go. I added a bit of cinnamon and cumin to this variation, which really paired well with the sort of bright earthiness of the beet flavor; this gives it a bit of a Mediterranean angle. Get your Cuisinart out and give this a whirl!

HUMMUS WITH FRESH BEETS

4 cloves garlic, peeled
1 medium beet, peeled and coarsely chopped
3 cups chickpeas (I used dried ones – feel free to use 2 cans)
juice and zest of one lemon
1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 cup tahini
2 tablespoons rice vinegar
1 teaspoon cumin
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt (or more to taste

Give the garlic cloves the first whirl in the processor to make sure they get broken down enough (you could also mince them if you don’t trust this). Then – add everything else and obliterate! I usually add a touch more liquid in either oil or lemon juice/vinegar form – you’ll want to taste this for yourself, as I said before. Do try adjusting the acidity before you add more salt, but sometimes a little more salt is just the ticket, too.

Other intriguing hummuses (hummi? hummae? hummum?) around the foodblogosphere:

Hummus with toasted walnuts from 101 Cookbooks – doesn’t that sound tasty? It’s going on my list.
Parsley hummus from the always healthy and awesome Kalyn’s Kitchen
Hummus with – wow – caramelized onions from No Recipes – talk about two great tastes that taste great together!
Cucumber hummus from Fat Free Vegan Kitchen – what a perfect way to lighten this up even more.
39 spice hummus from 28 Cooks – a variation I’ve always wanted to try making
Roasted butternut squash hummus from Jane Spice – filing this one away for fall!
Chipotle Hummus from Andrea’s Recipes – honestly, much as I love it, I had to take a little break from putting chipotle in every other recipe, but I think it’s time for it to return.

No exaggeration: I am literally going to make EVERY SINGLE ONE OF THESE. I am so serious.

One final note: I found this interesting post on 10 common mistakes when making hummus. I can honestly say I’m not guilty of any of them except the baking soda one, which I will start doing immediately (when using dried chickpeas, use baking soda when cooking them to make them softer), and on occasion using canned if I’m either in a huge hurry or out of dried – I definitely acknowledge it’s a shortcut.

– posted by Anne

Thanks for sharing!